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Laura M. Holsen, MS, PhD
Associate Research Associate, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Department of Psychiatry
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115

Research Location: One Brigham Circle

Research Email: lholsen@bwh.harvard.edu

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Research Narrative:

Dr. Holsen is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Research Associate in the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Holsen is a clinical neuroscientist working at the intersection of stress, eating behaviors, hormones, and brain, and sex differences therein. Her research focuses on the biological mechanisms — neural, neuroendocrine, and genetic — behind abnormal food motivation; stress response functioning and emotion regulation in individuals with major depression; the role of ghrelin and other metabolic hormones in mesolimbic circuitry responsivity, stress-related food intake, and cognitive functioning; and investigations of neural mechanisms of successful long-term weight loss maintenance. Research in Dr. Holsen’s lab uses functional MRI and neuroendocrine assessment in mood disorders, eating disorders, and obesity, with a goal of ameliorating the negative health outcomes of these conditions through identification of modifiable neurobiological targets that drive appetite, eating behaviors and cognition, and weight change. 


Education:
University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2007, Postdoctoral Fellow
University of Kansas, 2004, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University, 2001, M.S.

Publications (Pulled from Harvard Catalyst Profiles):

1. Cerit H, Christensen K, Moondra P, Klibanski A, Goldstein JM, Holsen LM. Divergent associations between ghrelin and neural responsivity to palatable food in hyperphagic and hypophagic depression. J Affect Disord. 2019 01 01; 242:29-38.

2. Plessow F, Marengi DA, Perry SK, Felicione JM, Franklin R, Holmes TM, Holsen LM, Makris N, Deckersbach T, Lawson EA. Effects of Intranasal Oxytocin on the Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Signal in Food Motivation and Cognitive Control Pathways in Overweight and Obese Men. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2018 02; 43(3):638-645.

3. Holsen LM, Davidson P, Cerit H, Hye T, Moondra P, Haimovici F, Sogg S, Shikora S, Goldstein JM, Evins AE, Stoeckel LE. Neural predictors of 12-month weight loss outcomes following bariatric surgery. Int J Obes (Lond). 2018 04; 42(4):785-793.

4. Holsen LM, Jackson B. Reward Capacity Predicts Leptin Dynamics During Laboratory-Controlled Eating in Women as a Function of Body Mass Index. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 09; 25(9):1564-1568.

5. Mareckova K, Holsen L, Admon R, Whitfield-Gabrieli S, Seidman LJ, Buka SL, Klibanski A, Goldstein JM. Neural - hormonal responses to negative affective stimuli: Impact of dysphoric mood and sex. J Affect Disord. 2017 11; 222:88-97.

6. Goldstein JM, Holsen L, Huang G, Hammond BD, James-Todd T, Cherkerzian S, Hale TM, Handa RJ. Prenatal stress-immune programming of sex differences in comorbidity of depression and obesity/metabolic syndrome. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2016 12; 18(4):425-436.

7. Mareckova K, Holsen LM, Admon R, Makris N, Seidman L, Buka S, Whitfield-Gabrieli S, Goldstein JM. Brain activity and connectivity in response to negative affective stimuli: Impact of dysphoric mood and sex across diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp. 2016 11; 37(11):3733-3744.

8. Mason SM, Bryn Austin S, Bakalar JL, Boynton-Jarrett R, Field AE, Gooding HC, Holsen LM, Jackson B, Neumark-Sztainer D, Sanchez M, Sogg S, Tanofsky-Kraff M, Rich-Edwards JW. Child Maltreatment's Heavy Toll: The Need for Trauma-Informed Obesity Prevention. Am J Prev Med. 2016 May; 50(5):646-649.

9. Lawson EA, Holsen LM, Santin M, DeSanti R, Meenaghan E, Eddy KT, Herzog DB, Goldstein JM, Klibanski A. Correction: Postprandial oxytocin secretion is associated with severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in anorexia nervosa. J Clin Psychiatry. 2015 05; 76(5):666.

10. Holsen LM, Goldstein JM. Valuation and cognitive circuitry in anorexia nervosa: disentangling appetite from the effort to obtain a reward. Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Apr 01; 77(7):604-6.