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Robert C. Green, MD, MPH
Associate Physician, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Geneticist, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Director, Genomes2People Research Program

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Department of Medicine
Genetics
75 Francis Street
Boston, MA 02115


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Research Narrative:

Robert C. Green, MD, MPH is a medical geneticist and physician-scientist who directs the G2P Research Program in translational genomics and health outcomes in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

 Dr. Green is principal investigator of the NIH-funded REVEAL Study, in which a cross-disciplinary team has conducted 4 separate multi-center randomized clinical trials since 2000, collectively enrolling 1100 individuals in order to explore emerging themes in translational genomics. Dr. Green also co-directs the NIH-funded PGen Study, one of the first prospective studies of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services. He is principal investigator of the MedSeq Project, the first NIH-funded randomized trial to explore the use of whole genome sequencing in the clinical practice of medicine and co-directs the BabySeq Project, the first NIH-funded trial of sequencing in newborns. The MedSeq and BabySeq Projects apply genome sequencing both in patients who are affected with hereditary disease and in those who are healthy, in order to study downstream impact on health, behavior and health care costs.

Dr. Green is currently Associate Director for Research of the Partners Center for Personalized Genetic Medicine, a Board Member of the Council for Responsible Genetics and a member of the Informed Cohort Oversight Boards for both the Children’s Hospital Boston Gene Partnership Program and the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative. He was the lead author of the recently published recommendations from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics for management of incidental findings in clinical sequencing.


Education:
Emory University School of Public Health, 2000, MPH
University of Virginia Medical School, 1980, MD
Amherst College, 1976, BA

Publications (Pulled from Harvard Catalyst Profiles):

1. Hart MR, Biesecker BB, Blout CL, Christensen KD, Amendola LM, Bergstrom KL, Biswas S, Bowling KM, Brothers KB, Conlin LK, Cooper GM, Dulik MC, East KM, Everett JN, Finnila CR, Ghazani AA, Gilmore MJ, Goddard KAB, Jarvik GP, Johnston JJ, Kauffman TL, Kelley WV, Krier JB, Lewis KL, McGuire AL, McMullen C, Ou J, Plon SE, Rehm HL, Richards CS, Romasko EJ, Sagardia AM, Spinner NB, Thompson ML, Turbitt E, Vassy JL, Wilfond BS, Veenstra DL, Berg JS, Green RC, Biesecker LG, Hindorff LA. Correction: Secondary findings from clinical genomic sequencing: prevalence, patient perspectives, family history assessment, and health-care costs from a multisite study. Genet Med. 2019 Jan 22.

2. Ceyhan-Birsoy O, Murry JB, Machini K, Lebo MS, Yu TW, Fayer S, Genetti CA, Schwartz TS, Agrawal PB, Parad RB, Holm IA, McGuire AL, Green RC, Rehm HL, Beggs AH. Interpretation of Genomic Sequencing Results in Healthy and Ill Newborns: Results from the BabySeq Project. Am J Hum Genet. 2019 Jan 03; 104(1):76-93.

3. Holm IA, McGuire A, Pereira S, Rehm H, Green RC, Beggs AH. Returning a Genomic Result for an Adult-Onset Condition to the Parents of a Newborn: Insights From the BabySeq Project. Pediatrics. 2019 Jan; 143(Suppl 1):S37-S43.

4. Pereira S, Robinson JO, Gutierrez AM, Petersen DK, Hsu RL, Lee CH, Schwartz TS, Holm IA, Beggs AH, Green RC, McGuire AL. Perceived Benefits, Risks, and Utility of Newborn Genomic Sequencing in the BabySeq Project. Pediatrics. 2019 Jan; 143(Suppl 1):S6-S13.

5. VanNoy GE, Genetti CA, McGuire AL, Green RC, Beggs AH, Holm IA. Challenging the Current Recommendations for Carrier Testing in Children. Pediatrics. 2019 Jan; 143(Suppl 1):S27-S32.

6. Brothers KB, Vassy JL, Green RC. Reconciling Opportunistic and Population Screening in Clinical Genomics. Mayo Clin Proc. 2019 Jan; 94(1):103-109.

7. Lane WJ, Aguad M, Smeland-Wagman R, Vege S, Mah HH, Joseph A, Blout CL, Nguyen TT, Lebo MS, Sidhu M, Lomas-Francis C, Kaufman RM, Green RC, Westhoff CM. A whole genome approach for discovering the genetic basis of blood group antigens: independent confirmation for P1 and Xga. Transfusion. 2019 Mar; 59(3):908-915.

8. Marshall AA, Zaccardelli A, Yu Z, Prado MG, Liu X, Miller Kroouze R, Kalia SS, Green RC, Triedman NA, Lu B, Deane KD, Iversen MD, Karlson EW, Sparks JA. Effect of communicating personalized rheumatoid arthritis risk on concern for developing RA: A randomized controlled trial. Patient Educ Couns. 2018 Dec 10.

9. Veitch DP, Weiner MW, Aisen PS, Beckett LA, Cairns NJ, Green RC, Harvey D, Jack CR, Jagust W, Morris JC, Petersen RC, Saykin AJ, Shaw LM, Toga AW, Trojanowski JQ. Understanding disease progression and improving Alzheimer's disease clinical trials: Recent highlights from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Alzheimers Dement. 2019 Jan; 15(1):106-152.

10. Hart MR, Biesecker BB, Blout CL, Christensen KD, Amendola LM, Bergstrom KL, Biswas S, Bowling KM, Brothers KB, Conlin LK, Cooper GM, Dulik MC, East KM, Everett JN, Finnila CR, Ghazani AA, Gilmore MJ, Goddard KAB, Jarvik GP, Johnston JJ, Kauffman TL, Kelley WV, Krier JB, Lewis KL, McGuire AL, McMullen C, Ou J, Plon SE, Rehm HL, Richards CS, Romasko EJ, Miren Sagardia A, Spinner NB, Thompson ML, Turbitt E, Vassy JL, Wilfond BS, Veenstra DL, Berg JS, Green RC, Biesecker LG, Hindorff LA. Secondary findings from clinical genomic sequencing: prevalence, patient perspectives, family history assessment, and health-care costs from a multisite study. Genet Med. 2018 Oct 05.